Shooting Purple Film!

Here are the last frames of my lomochrome purple 35mm film; it’s great fun to use and constantly provides unpredictable results, if you come across a pack, 35mm or 120mm, definitely give it a go!

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Street Photography: When the Subject Spots You…

There are many different approaches you can take when it comes to street photography. From the shoving-a-flash in your face and not giving a damn technique (Bruce Gilden) to going completely unoticed like Vivian Maier. Today I went out to shoot street photography on the streets of Brighton for 3 hours, but rather than showing you my favourite shots I thought i’d share some of my outtakes.  And these are outtakes because the subjects in the frame are looking either at me or the lens. Some photographers aim for these sort of images but not me.

Before you see the images I thought I’d share with you some advice if someone notices you doing street photography or has a problem with it. 99% of the time the person will keep walking and not give another thought to you or your camera. But on the odd occasion that someone takes issue with you taking their picture here are a few tips:

1.Stay calm and be polite.

2. Delete the image and show them (no image is worth a public argument)

3.Know your rights (in the UK you have the right to photograph in public areas)

4.Don’t let it affect your confidence and keep shooting..

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Photography A-Z

For my latest project I am undertaking different assignments found in the book ‘The Photographers Playbook‘. For this one set by Susan Meiselas you have to go out and capture the alphabet using trees, shadows and anything else you can find. I had great fun with this and overall it took me 1.5 hours, which is a perfect amount of time to have enjoy photographing and not freeze in the British weather..

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A

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B

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C

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D

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E

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F

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g (backwards)

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H

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i

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J

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K

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L

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M

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n

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O

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P

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Q

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R

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S

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T

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U

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V

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W

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X

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Y

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Z (backwards)

 

How to use the background in Street Photography

I have recently been posting a lot of street photography to this blog and social media. It used to be a personal passion but since posting it to my blog I have received some great feedback and lots of brilliant questions.  Many of the questions centre around how to improve when it comes to street photography. Unfortunately the phrase ‘street photography is 99% failure’ is correct. Some days I have spent hours trying to find that perfect shot, other days it had taken minutes. But there are some tips and tricks that can really help focus your eye when it comes to shooting street photography.

On this post I am going to talk about how the background effect your photographs using examples I shot yesterday. The photos aren’t going to make it into a photo book anytime soon but they do demonstrate how important the background is. You don’t want it detracting attention from the main subject you need it to enhance the image.

 

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Advertising is always a good starting point. Here I waited for a women to walk into the frame; creating a symmetry between the two faces with similar expressions.

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Here again advertising provided the backdrop for the image. The contrast is created by the two portraits, both women look similar but one is a model and the other a Londoner on her lunch break.

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The light really makes this image. I was shooting in bright midday sun before work so getting the dark back ground and bright light on his face makes it look like he’s coming out of the shadows.

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An unflattering image of this tourist but it shows how central composition and matching colours really draws your eye in. By capturing this women in a blue top surrounded by blue scaffolding it keeps the image together and succinct.

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By using this window it is both the foreground and background. The colours captured in the shop and reflections all come together to create a bright, busy atmosphere which sums up the feeling of Oxford Street.

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Oxford Street is a constant movement of people so seeing someone stood still is a rarity. To photograph this man I took a step back so passers-by entered the frame to give some context and sense of location. To emphasise his stillness even more I could’ve used a slower shutter speed.

If you’ve never tried street photography before I would highly recommend giving it a go. It’s a great way to stay motivated and get the creative juices flowing.

You can also find me over on instagram @madisonbeachphotos  where I will be posting lots of images from newly developed 35mm films.

 

 

Shooting Street Photography in London

London is one of my favourite cities in the world for street photography. It’s buzzing with people everyday-night and day.  Here are some street snaps from the past week in the best people watching (capturing) locations. These photographs include tourists, DIY instruments and of course, hiding from the British rain.

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Outside Tate Modern

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Regent Street

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Regent Street

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Soho

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Soho

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Soho

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Outside the Photographers Gallery

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Outside the Photographers Gallery

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Oxford Street

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Oxford Street

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Oxford Street

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Oxford Street

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My favourite shot of the day, Oxford Street.

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Oxford Street

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Oxford Street

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Oxford Street

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Tottenham Court Road

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Tottenham Court Road

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Tottenham Court Road