Finding time to Photograph

The only way to get better at photography is shooting as much as possible. But this is often easier said than done especially as many people have demanding careers  and family responsibilities. Whether or not your job involves photography making time for personal creating work is incredibly important. Having recently started a new job making time to shoot and edit personal work has been one of my priorities. Here I have fitted it in to my travels to and from work.

On my way to work..

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..and heading home from work

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Finding time to photograph at different times of the day also allows you to capture various tones and a range of people. The atmosphere of London changes completely from walking to work in the day to traveling home a night.

Even if you don’t do anything with your personal work it’s a great way to keep you motivated.

You can find me on Instagram @madisonbeachphotos or over on my website.

Shooting in Golden Hour

If your looking to improve your photography utilising the golden hour is a must. This is considered the hour (or two) after sunrise and before sunset. Midday-sun creates strong contrasts and often over saturated images. Whereas the golden hour provides much softer colours. While visiting my family for Easter I went for a walk around the suburban surroundings, taking photos of what could be considered boring subjects but showcasing how golden hour brings out a different, often more preferable colour palette.

I’ve spent the last 3 days visiting exhibitions all around London including the Sony Photography Awards at Somerset House (go see it!). In the meantime I’m getting back to updating my Instagram with photos from my exhibitions adventures, with a bit of street photography thrown in for good measure..

@madisonbeachphotos

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Shooting from the Hip

Many well-known street photographers have embraced the technique of shooting from the hip. Where you quite literally photograph everything from hip height without looking through the view finder. I got my hands on a Sony A7RII so thought I’d use this as a challenge to test the cameras controls, functions and focus. I chose a 35mm f/2.8 lens as this is my personal preference when it comes to street photography.

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I’m happy with the varied results and had a lot of fun achieving them. This technique makes you think on your feet by having to consider composition and focal length on the move without looking through the viewfinder. If you want to get to grips with a new camera or want to make the switch from auto to manual this is a great way to do it. Modifying the aperture, ISO and shutter speed have an obvious impact on what you capture.

IG:@madisonbeachphotos