Shooting Expired Kodak Film

Last year I won the Ginnel Foto Fest Analogue awards. Part of my prize was being sent a box full of film. Some I’ve used before such as portra and Agfa, but there was also a roll of Kodak Tri X medium format film estimated to be 50 years old.

I have always wanted to shoot it so last weekend when me and my cousin went to Peacehaven. A small suburban town on the English coast where my cousin, Harry, grew up.

I got some surprisingly good results..

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If you ever get your hands on some expired film be sure to double check if your local lab develops it. After walking 40 minutes to mine it turns out they don’t develop expired films. If you’re based in the UK I would strongly recommend AG Photolab who are super friendly and based in Birmingham. I sent the film off on Wednesday and got it back today!

Returning to Medium Format Photography

It’s been way to long since I last picked up my Yashica 635 and shot a roll of film. So long in fact the last time I shot medium format was with the Diana F+  back in February. But after flicking through one of my favourite photo books (Vivian Maier) I was inspired to go out and shoot a roll of 120mm.

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My Yashica 635, a beautiful camera with a temperamental focus. 

For the last few years I have been focusing on street and travel photography so I thought I’d try my hand at some portraits.

I was shooting on Portra 160 film which is always my film of choice for portraits. And as the sun set we headed inside..

The film performed incredibly well considering I was shooting at ISO 160 in such limited light.  If you’ve never shot medium format photography- I highly recommend it! Although it comes at a higher cost than 35mm and on average you only get 12 shots, the detail you can capture with a good camera and the experience is well worth the extra pennies!

Shooting medium format with the Diana F+

At the weekend I visited the beautiful East Sussex town of Lewes. I shot medium format images using the Diana F+. The camera is just a bit of fun to use, I wouldn’t recommend it for project work, but its a good way to experiment with film photography. It has a shutter speed of 1/60th of a second which you can’t change, so next time I’ll definitely be using a tri-pod for every shot! Still I had a great day and like the dreamy effect on the images..

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Shooting on the Diana F+

I have a love/hate relationship when it comes to Lomography. Sometimes the unpredictable nature of the cameras produce great results, other times the unreliable pieces of kit create images which just remind you how much money you wasted getting the film developed.

But today I am loving the Diana F+, a medium-format Lomography camera. A couple of weeks ago I picked it up for the first time in about a year and used it to capture the atmosphere of the Brighton F.C promotion parade along with scenes around the city.

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looking like a painting the red stands out well against the green on the Lomography film

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Vignetting is a common occurrence with the Diana F+

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Although blurred the Lomography iso 100 film picked up the soft pink colour really well

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No idea what happened here, its not even the first frame 

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On almost all Lomography cameras achieving multiple exposures is really simple

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This shot was taken in bright daylight, but the dark sky makes the red flairs stand out

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The camera froze the movement really effectively in this image..

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and not so in this one but I love the blur as it shows how busy and excited the city was.

The Diana F+ is not a technical camera; when you’re ready to shoot you just select the weather conditions and distance from the subject using levers on the lens. So you can see why using a camera like this is so unpredictable and how much room for error it leaves espcially as the viewfinder is above the lens which gives you a higher perspective. But with all this being said, I’m really happy with the results and had great fun using it. I would never use solely this camera when capturing an event like this; I took hundreds of photos on my Sony A7R II. But if you just want a good time and want to try out medium-format the Diana F+ is a great starting point.

Check out more of my images over on Instagram @madisonbeachphotos